• Value chain

    Esa Mikko Henttonen (CBS)Academy of Business Strategy

    Mikko Henttonen (CBS) MSc BSc is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is value chain. He has achieved an MSc in Business Economics, a BSc in Information Technology and BSc in Production Economics from the University of Jyvaskyla. He has been employed as an Internal Auditor, Manager, Financial Auditor and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the mechanical manufacturing, paper and telecommunications industries His clients or employers have included KONE Corporation, PricewaterhouseCoopers, KPMG and TietoEnator. He has geographical working experience in Finland, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. He speaks Swedish, English and German. His service skills incorporate accounting, finance, operations, strategy and value chain.

    To contact Mikko Henttonen, please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Mikko's CBS Blog.

  • Product-line finance

    Michael Avery (CBS)Academy of Business Strategy

    Michael Avery (CBS) MBA BS CPA is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is product-line finance. He has achieved an MBA and BS from Arizona State University. He has been employed as Senior FP&A, Senior Finance Manager Leader, Director of Finance, Auditor and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the consumer products, aerospace, oil and gas industries. His clients or employers have included General Electric, Hawker Beechcraft Corporation, Schwarzkopf and Henkel and the Dial Corporation. He has geographical working experience in the United States of America. He speaks English. His service skills incorporate financial planning, financial analysis, financial controlling and product-line finance.

    To contact Michael Avery , please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Michael's CBS Blog.

  • Cloud computing

    Michael O'Toole CBSAcademy of Business Strategy

    Michael O'Toole (CBS) DMS BA is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is cloud computing. He has achieved a DMS from Henley Management College and a BA from The Open University. He has been employed as an Advisor, Project Manager, Director, Operations Manager and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the financial services, manufacturing and telecommunications industries. His clients or employers have included FQMS, Project Logic, Stratos Consulting, YPSL, Worldcom, STFS, DFCL, General Electric, ICL and Automatic Data Processing (ADP). He has geographical working experience in Japan, Hong Kong and Switzerland. He speaks English, Japanese, French and German. His service skills incorporate project management, training and cloud computing.

    To contact Michael O'Toole, please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Michael's CBS Blog.

  • Organizational management

    Domingo Tercero-Sierra (CBS)Academy of Business Strategy

    Domingo Tercero-Sierra (CBS) DBA MA BSc is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is organizational management. He has achieved a DBA from the California Coast University, an MA and BSc from the University of Barcelona. He has been employed as a Managing Director, Commercial Director, International Division Manager, International Sales Manager, International Purchasing Manager, Area Manager and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the health, technology, logistics and transportation industries His clients or employers have included Certificacion de Lesiones Espana, Truck and Wheel, Transportes Bidasoa SA, Decoy Safe Company, American Medical and Dental SL and Tudor SA. He has geographical working experience in the United States of America, Spain and Chile. He speaks English, Spanish and French. His service skills incorporate business projections, orientations, decision making and organizational management.

    To contact Domingo Tercero-Sierra, please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Domingo's CBS Blog.

  • Process innovation

    Adolf Allesch (CBS)Academy of Business Strategy

    Adolf Allesch (CBS) MBA BS is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is process innovation. He has achieved an MBA, BS in Aero Engineering and a BS in Industrial Technology from Arizona State University. He has been employed as Global SAP Executive, Lead Technology Partner, Practice Leader, Senior Manager and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the pharmaceutical, consumer products, retail and industrial products industries. His clients or employers have included IBM, Capgemini, Ernst & Young, Deloitte Consulting and EDS. He has geographical working experience in the United Kingdom, Singapore and Japan. He speaks English, Spanish and French. His service skills incorporate process design, enterprise architecture, governance, ERP lifecycle management and process innovation.

    To contact Adolf Allesch, please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Adolf's CBS Blog.

  • Project strategy

    Manuel Del Rio Diaz (CBS)Academy of Business Strategy

    Manuel Del Rio Diaz (CBS) MSc BS is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is project strategy. He has achieved an MSc from North Dakota State University and a BS from Instituto Tecnologico de la Laguna. He has been employed as Director of Engineering, Project Management Director, IT Director and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the IT consulting, telecommunications and digital content industries. His clients or employers have included Sytecso, ACS Inc, Aladia Airlines, Getronics, Avantel and ITESM. He has geographical working experience in Mexico, USA and Peru. He speaks Spanish and English. His service skills incorporate project management, business process implementation, IT consulting and project strategy.

    To contact Manuel Del Rio Diaz, please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Manuel's CBS Blog.

  • Strategy development

    Alain Delecroix (CBS)Academy of Business Strategy

    Alain Delecroix (CBS) MBA MEEA BEng is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is strategy development. He has achieved an MBA from the Institut d’Administration des Entreprises, a BEng from Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Electronique d’Electrotechnique d’Informatique et d’Hydraulique de Toulouse and a MEEA from Paul Sabatier University. He has been employed as President, Vice President, CEO, Marketing Director, Sales Director and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the aerospace, telecommunications, defense and security industries. His clients or employers have included Almade Consulting, Thales, Alcatel, Omera, Astrium and Laboratoire Central de Télécommunications. He has geographical working experience in France, United Arab Emirates and China. He speaks French and English. His service skills incorporate strategic planning, international operations, organizational and strategy development.

    To contact Alain Delecroix, please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Alain's CBS Blog.

  • Product marketing

    Hongjun Li (CBS)Academy of Business Strategy

    Hongjun Li (CBS) MBA BA is an approved Certified Business Specialist (CBS) with the Academy of Business Strategy and his specialist subject is product marketing. He has achieved an MBA from Baylor University and a BA from the Nanjing Institute of International Relations in China. He has been employed as an Executive Director, Senior Director, Vice President, Product Manager, Product Marketing Manager, Industry Analyst and Consultant for various companies and has experience within the telecommunications, information technology, consumer electronics and retail industries His clients or employers have included Kodiak Networks, Interphase Corporation, Siemens and Parks Associates. He has geographical working experience in the United States of America and China. He speaks English and Mandarin Chinese. His service skills incorporate business strategy, market research, competitive intelligence, strategic marketing and product marketing.

    To contact Hongjun Li, please contact the Academy of Business Strategy by forwarding an email, or visit Hongjun's CBS Blog.

  • Predicting the future

    Predicting the future is not something at which human beings have been particularly successful. Even if we have some rough idea about the likely trends, the plans we make to cope with them may not work out the way in which we intended. The more we learn about human resourcing in organizations, the more we understand how difficult it is to manage the present, let alone the future. It is readily apparent that human resource planning has limitations. In the laissez faire markets of global capitalism, organizational survival is perceived to depend upon two imperatives:

    Alignment of outputs with demand;
    Sufficient adaptability to cope with change.

    Every organization is subject to these imperatives. Even organizations in the public and voluntary sectors which, by tradition, were not exposed directly to market competition have been forced to comply. It is currently a norm and expectation of society that organizations must deliver services and products with maximum efficiency and at lowest cost. Human resourcing has been at the forefront of this consumer-and market orientated philosophy and great emphasis has been placed on the concept of labour utilization.

    The traditional approach has been stereotyped as hire and fire. Hire when additional labour or new skills are required and fire to shed workers when there is no longer demand for their labour or particular skills. Short-term increases in demand were met in the past by using overtime, paid at premium rates to workers already on the payroll. Most low-skill work was organized with tasks broken down into simple steps performed by individuals requiring little training and development. Short-term decreases in demand were compensated by laying off part of the workforce and decreases in long-term demand were compensated by redundancy.
    Whether such stereotype is in fact applicable today is debatable.

    Debates about whether managers in organizations have sought a new approach to managing and utilising labour have been dominated by the concept of the flexible firm. This concept was of course proposed by Atkinson at the Institute of Manpower Studies. The concept was that of an ideal organization design, promoted as the solution to the problems of the operating environment. Atkinson specifically argued that firms had been forced to change their strategy in the face of market stagnation, job loss, uncertainty, technological change and pressures to reduce working time. He suggested that the opportunity to move towards the flexible firm model was facilitated at the time due to uncertainties resulting from turbulent markets and new technology, slack labour markets and the inability of weakened trade unions to resist change.

    This has in part contributed towards the empowerment of employees who have learnt to become more flexible themselves and as such employees now tend to find that they spend less time working for each individual employer and are more aware of the need to manage their own career plans rather than leave their career destiny to trusted employers who traditionally have had entirely different priorities. Ultimately the model of the flexible firm has attracted an enormous volume of criticism from other commentators. In addition to criticisms of Atkinson’s methodology and narrowness of samples, the evidence from other empirical studies has been contradictory.

    In reality it is difficult, if not impossible to find a “one size suits all” solution for human resource strategy. Financial strategy by comparison is built around the core resource of money and as such this can be calculated accurately and financial strategy can to a degree be centralized and implemented across a wide variety of industries and companies. This view is supported by the fact that most companies select from a small number of financial accounting softwares regardless of their country location, industry sector, or even culture. In contrast human resource strategy is built around the core resource of people. All individuals are different and while performance and behavioural patterns can be established these tend to differ depending upon industry sector, geographical location, culture and economic cycles. It is no coincidence therefore that most human resource strategy tends to focus upon emergent change rather than prescriptive change, the former already constituting sufficient challenge.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Dr. A. Lewis. DBA MBA BBA is an accomplished global human resource specialist who has worked within various market leading firms within the manufacturing, automotive, engineering, FMCG and aviation industries. He has extensive experience in recruitment, human capital management, training, globalization, outsourcing and employment law. He is recognized within various industries for his extensive knowledge of globalization and human resource strategy. He is multi-lingual (speaking five languages fluently) and has worked within 8 different countries. He now works within the professional education industry and is a registered Professor at the Academy of Business Strategy.

  • Globalization and human resourcing

    Globalization refers to the growing economic dependence among countries as reflected in increasing cross-border flows of goods, services, capital and knowledge. At an organizational level, globalization can refer historically to the extent to which a company has expanded its operations so that it engages in cross-border flows of capital, goods and knowledge across subsidiaries. It can also be used to describe a corporate strategy, designed to reap the benefits of becoming a global company. Globalization at all levels is, therefore, very much an outcome of corporate decision makers who perceive globalization as an attractive and feasible proposition.

    As such, the process need not be an inexorable one. Economic uncertainties may drive national governments and corporations towards the protectionism of defending a home market and away from the free-market ideology that has been synonymous with globalization. A number of economic downturns have led to unresolved debates about what can be done to prevent global capitalism from destroying itself. There is a concern that global capitalism’s blindness to anything but the bottom line and an apparent indifference to inequalities suffered in the poorest countries make the system unsustainable, which in turn places in jeopardy the living standards within the developed world.

    In reality globalization will continue to be a critical success factor for most companies and for most developing countries alike. The progress made with information technology and communications and in particular the internet during the past decade has made this inevitable in much the same way as with the industrial revolution during the last century. Indeed a global economy and global business remain very much a critical component of our existence now. All of the best known branded names, drinks, fast foods, sports equipment, automobiles, petroleum, computers, pharmaceuticals, electronics and other consumer products can be found in the majority of the world’s countries.

    Popular statistics can also reveal the dominance of multinational companies: over 50% of the world’s top 100 economies are not countries but companies. The largest 500 companies control over 50% of the world’s wealth and conduct over half of its trade. The ten biggest companies together turn over more money than the world’s smallest 100 countries and the world’s second largest multinational, Shell, owns or leases 400 million acres of land, which is larger than 146 countries put together. Consequently to talk about differences between the UK, US and Europe’s country economies can be considered somewhat futile these days. What we should be talking about is the differences between global company economies. The latest economic downturn has all but confirmed this.

    We can sense the impelling force of globalization ourselves. We can also appreciate that the economic liberalization of the world’s developing countries and the technological advances in telecommunications and transportation has made globalization an enticing prospect for those corporations seeking to grow and survive. In the face of increasing international competition, multinational company chiefs have identified the opportunities afforded by the globalization process as the means by which to meet the challenges. In turn their business decisions help to sustain the process. These international opportunities include capturing new markets and realizing great economies of scale; the creation of extensive networks for the transfer of new ideas and understanding across the organization; and the optimal allocation and relocation of resources. All of these have set an agenda for an organization’s international human resourcing strategy. Attention to human resourcing activities and initiatives will be required to mobilize those resources that will best contribute towards growth and increased profits, leading ultimately to long-term corporate sustainability and survival.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Dr. A. Lewis. DBA MBA BBA is an accomplished global human resource specialist who has worked within various market leading firms within the manufacturing, automotive, engineering, FMCG and aviation industries. He has extensive experience in recruitment, human capital management, training, globalization, outsourcing and employment law. He is recognized within various industries for his extensive knowledge of globalization and human resource strategy. He is multi-lingual (speaking five languages fluently) and has worked within 8 different countries. He now works within the professional education industry and is a registered Professor at the Academy of Business Strategy.

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